Auction No. 106

Letters by A. Einstein and Other Illustrious Personalities, Zionism, Jewish Art, letters of Rabbis and Rebbes and Collection of letters to Sir Moses Montefiore from the archive of the late Rabbi Avraham Shisha - London - Buyer's commission 22%

March 6, 2018
Opening $ 500
Estimate $ 1,000 - $ 1,500
Sold for $ 1,464
Including buyer's premium

Long responsum from Rabbi Moshe Mordechai Epstein to Rabbi Yechiel Weinberg, head of the Rabbinical Seminary in Berlin, author of Sridei Esh. Hebron, 1929.

Specifications: [6] pages of paper, official letter paper of the Knesset Yisrael yeshiva in Hebron. 22x28 cm. Entirely in his handwriting and with his signature.

Unique Features: The responsum deals with chalitza performed by an apostate Jew and by one who disbelieves the entire Torah.

At the beginning of the responsum, Rabbi Moshe Mordechai Epstein writes that he is in Hebron and does not have enough books with him, and is also not in a good state of health, and can therefore not rule the halacha on this topic, but will write comments on the matter due to his love for the questioner. The responsum was printed in ShU"T Levush Mordechai 64.

Background: Rabbi Moshe Mordechai Epstein was born in 1866. He studied in the Volzhin Yeshiva, where he was considered a genius. After the passing of the well-known philanthropist Shraga Feivel Frank, his widow wanted to fulfill his will and to marry their daughters to great Torah scholars. She selected Rabbi Moshe Mordechai Epstein at the recommendation of the Netziv. He was asked by the Alter of Slabodka to serve as rosh yeshiva of Knesset Yisrael. He was also active in the Council of Torah Sages. Due to the decree drafting yeshiva students into the army, the yeshiva was transferred to the city of Hebron in the Land of Israel in 1924. He was extremely weakened by the massacres of 1929 and passed away in 1934. He wrote the Levush Mordechai series of books.

Condition: Fine. Binder holes damage a few letters. Tiny tears without lack.

Category
Manuscripts & letters. Ashkenaz